3 new ways technology is helping to advance medicine

Imaging Cameras improving cancer surgery Every year, 14 million people are diagnosed with cancer; of those, around eight million will die. Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide; across the globe, doctors and scientists are fighting to reduce the number of cancer deaths by detecting cancer early and promoting new ways of battling it. In the past, imaging technologies such as radiography, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography have proved vital in the fight against cancer, helping doctors to diagnose the disease quickly to increase the chance of recovery. Now, near-infrared fluorescence (NRF) has emerged as a new, powerful imaging tool in the battle against cancer. NRF imaging is used during surgery to enable surgeons to easily distinguish between healthy tissue and cancerous tissue. Surgery is a highly effective method of treating cancer patients, but its success rate depends largely on how much of the cancer is removed; if cancer cells remain in the body after surgery, the surgery’s success rate is greatly diminished. Advocates of NRF hope the technique will give surgeons greater visibility of cancer margins and thereby increase their ability to precisely remove cancerous tissue. Companies such as andor.com are researching how we can…

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New Medical Robots Can Be as Small as Bacteria!

If you’re being told by someone in 20 years ago that you can create a robot which has a size as small as bacteria, the people might be said some words right in front your face, “You must be a psycho, as it’s impossible!” Well, guess what! The brilliant ETH Zurich researchers have put on their own efforts. In the end, they’re able to create world’s first medical micro-robots has a size as small as bacteria. Check out the above figure, you might find that the robot is somewhat like a form of Flagella sp. Yep, it isn’t April’s Fool and you didn’t get it wrong here. This is the latest medical micro-robots, which has an average length of 5 – 15 µm long. They’re in spiral shape, tiny head and can easily swim at a speed of up to one body length per second! Honestly, you cannot even see the micro-robots at all, unless you’re observing them under a microscope. The researchers also have given a name for these medical micro-robots and they’re called “Artificial Bacterial Flagella (ABF)”. Bradley Nelson, the professor at the Institute of Robotic and Intelligent Systems at ETH Zurich said that the ABFs could be…

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